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Follow the Data: Make Soft Skills Your L&D Super Power

In a surprising study, Google discovered that its highest performing teams aren’t those stacked with scientists, but interdisciplinary groups heavily benefitting from employees bringing strong soft skills to the collaborative process. Further, additional research found that it’s these soft skills, like good communication and empathetic leadership, not hard skills, that comprise the top predictors of success within the company.

Research from MIT Sloan echoed Google’s findings, showing that soft skills training, even in more hands-on, technical roles in a factory setting, can improve work productivity. Initiated at five Bangalore factories, a controlled, twelve-month trial revealed that training in problem solving, communication, and decision-making yielded a 250 percent ROI in eight months.

Time and time again, industry data, market trends, and insights from top business leaders highlight soft skills as important, and yet they’re still often overlooked.

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3 Employee Learning Myths Debunked: Competency, Retention, and Productivity

As technology reshapes the future of work, workers are struggling to remain relevant. In an edX survey conducted last year, only one fifth of respondents considered the education from their college major to be translatable to their current field and more than one third experienced a lack of proficiency in at least one new skill area or subject area of a current or past job. In other words, your employees are also feeling the skills gap.
Workers are aware that they aren’t fully prepared for today’s changing skill requirements — but unsure how best to ask for help with professional development and training. In the same edX survey, almost half of respondents reported feeling uncomfortable asking their employer for help with learning opportunities and costs.

To counter the stigma of asking for help, anticipate the reasons employees are nervous to ask in the first place, and structure your messaging and programming accordingly. In this article, originally published in Forbes, edX founder and CEO Anant Agrawal debunks the three most common myths about employee learning:

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Why Corporate Learning Strategies Need to Include Active Learning

Today’s companies aren’t asking if it makes sense to implement e-learning and training programs, but how. Employees’ time is limited, resources are constrained, and navigating the learning landscape can be difficult. How do you maximize your employees’ attention, get them up to speed on critical skills as quickly as possible, and, most importantly, ensure that learning is effective?

The problem is complex and the stakes are higher than ever. Businesses face enormous risk and competition in today’s digital economy and need to ensure that critical functions are in the hands of people with the proven ability to do. To meet this demand, companies must provide learning to their employees that is deep and transformational.

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Customer-Driven Innovation: Why We Have a Corporate Advisory Board

We are at a moment of great inflection in education. The gap between traditional higher education and the competencies companies need is widening as the evolution of technology and related skills accelerate.

edX sits at the center of industry and academia, bridging the gap between in-demand skills and education opportunities. As a non-profit founded by MIT and Harvard, our mission is to expand access to high-quality education to everyone, everywhere, including corporate learners. Our corporate partners share this mission and are similarly committed to providing their employees with the skills and learning they need for the future of work.

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How Boston’s C-suites can prepare their employees for the future of work [via The Boston Globe]

Corporate America is grappling with the impact of automation and artificial intelligence on today’s workforce, and many industries are facing obstacles when it comes to hiring and retaining workers who have the skills needed in our increasingly changing economy.

So how can business leaders adapt to the changing landscape?
edX President and COO, Adam Medros, discusses in his latest piece on BostonGlobe.com

Read the Article

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Follow the Data: Make Soft Skills Your L&D Super Power

In a surprising study, Google discovered that its highest performing teams aren’t those stacked with scientists, but interdisciplinary groups heavily benefitting from employees bringing strong soft skills to the collaborative process. Further, additional research found that it’s these soft skills, like good communication and empathetic leadership, not hard skills, that comprise the top predictors of success within the company.

Research from MIT Sloan echoed Google’s findings, showing that soft skills training, even in more hands-on, technical roles in a factory setting, can improve work productivity. Initiated at five Bangalore factories, a controlled, twelve-month trial revealed that training in problem solving, communication, and decision-making yielded a 250 percent ROI in eight months.

Time and time again, industry data, market trends, and insights from top business leaders highlight soft skills as important, and yet they’re still often overlooked.

3 Employee Learning Myths Debunked: Competency, Retention, and Productivity

As technology reshapes the future of work, workers are struggling to remain relevant. In an edX survey conducted last year, only one fifth of respondents considered the education from their college major to be translatable to their current field and more than one third experienced a lack of proficiency in at least one new skill area or subject area of a current or past job. In other words, your employees are also feeling the skills gap.
Workers are aware that they aren’t fully prepared for today’s changing skill requirements — but unsure how best to ask for help with professional development and training. In the same edX survey, almost half of respondents reported feeling uncomfortable asking their employer for help with learning opportunities and costs.

To counter the stigma of asking for help, anticipate the reasons employees are nervous to ask in the first place, and structure your messaging and programming accordingly. In this article, originally published in Forbes, edX founder and CEO Anant Agrawal debunks the three most common myths about employee learning:

Why Corporate Learning Strategies Need to Include Active Learning

Today’s companies aren’t asking if it makes sense to implement e-learning and training programs, but how. Employees’ time is limited, resources are constrained, and navigating the learning landscape can be difficult. How do you maximize your employees’ attention, get them up to speed on critical skills as quickly as possible, and, most importantly, ensure that learning is effective?

The problem is complex and the stakes are higher than ever. Businesses face enormous risk and competition in today’s digital economy and need to ensure that critical functions are in the hands of people with the proven ability to do. To meet this demand, companies must provide learning to their employees that is deep and transformational.

Customer-Driven Innovation: Why We Have a Corporate Advisory Board

We are at a moment of great inflection in education. The gap between traditional higher education and the competencies companies need is widening as the evolution of technology and related skills accelerate.

edX sits at the center of industry and academia, bridging the gap between in-demand skills and education opportunities. As a non-profit founded by MIT and Harvard, our mission is to expand access to high-quality education to everyone, everywhere, including corporate learners. Our corporate partners share this mission and are similarly committed to providing their employees with the skills and learning they need for the future of work.

How Boston’s C-suites can prepare their employees for the future of work [via The Boston Globe]

Corporate America is grappling with the impact of automation and artificial intelligence on today’s workforce, and many industries are facing obstacles when it comes to hiring and retaining workers who have the skills needed in our increasingly changing economy.

So how can business leaders adapt to the changing landscape?
edX President and COO, Adam Medros, discusses in his latest piece on BostonGlobe.com

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